Townsend athletes’ superstitions

Townsend+athletes+superstitions
HTML tutorial

The pressure of performing well in sports can be overwhelming for many athletes. The ways people cope with this stress are as vast as the number of individuals who play sports. From Karl Malone praying to the free throw gods to Wade Boggs eating chicken before games, many athletes have practiced famous rituals to settle their minds and ensure success. In fact, Townsend’s own athletes are no exception.

Junior Shane Werther, a center field player for the school’s baseball team, said, “Last year as a team we had a stuffed bunny that we used to touch during playoffs to bring good luck.’’ One of his more personal superstitions is always putting his left sock on before the right one on game day. “I did that when I was 10 and had like the best game of my life. After that, it just became a routine,’’ he added.

Senior Rosa Caputo, captain of the girls’ varsity basketball team uses a different approach to bring luck to her team. She said, “For every game, right before the starting five go into the court we huddle together and say ‘Dribble, dribble, dribble, I made it.’’’

Sophomore Laila Ahmed, also a player on the girls’ basketball team, added that during the warm-ups, the last person to shoot a basket has to make a shot in. If not, they have to shoot again until they make it.

Junior Julia Hong on the bowling team said that she cannot go a match without wearing her lucky necklace and ring on her left hand. “I just feel more secure and confident in a match with them on,’’ she explained. Also, wearing her basketball socks during bowling matches seems to do the trick. “When I wore them in the playoffs against Franny, I did well after being in a slump for a while.’’

Sophomore Vansh Patel, 2nd doubles player on the tennis team also relies on jewelry for his luck. He said, “Without it [his lucky necklace], I feel like I’m not playing as good as I know I can. I know it’s all in my head, but having the necklace is like having a security blanket.’’

close